Equitable
Grantmaking.
Sustainable
Change.

Who We Are

Mission: The Andrus Family Fund supports the self-determination, power and liberation of Black, Brown and Indigenous youth impacted by youth justice, child welfare and other disruptive systems.

Vision: We envision a just society in which Black, Brown, Indigenous, LGBTQIA, disabled and undocumented youth are thriving in empowered and supportive communities, free from state violence and family separation.

History: The Surdna Foundation’s Board of Directors launched AFF in January 2000 as a next generation philanthropy to engage more than 400 extended family members between the ages of 25 and 45 in public service and organized philanthropy. While AFF is legally a fund of Surdna, it manages its own grant making program and processes.

Our Board

Meg Belais

C'Ardiss Gardner Gleser
Chair

Lindsey Griffith

Jesus Gonzalez

Daryl Hannah

Raymond Holgado

Megan Kelly

Emily Klass
Secretary

Kay Korchnak

Kaitlin Miles
Vice Chair

Elizabeth Olsson

Marcus Pope

Julia Voorhees
Treasurer

Zelpha Williams

Our Team

Nyoka Acevedo
Interim Director

Zaira Cedano
Program Associate

Movement Partner Advisory Council

Jenny Arwade
Co-Executive Director, Communities United

Kisha Bird
Director of Youth Policy, CLASP

Jaime T. Koppel
Co-Director, Communities for Just Schools Fund

Charles Long
Resource Coordinator, Movement for Black Lives

Susan Mangold
CEO, Juvenile Law Center

Juan Martinez-Pineda
Senior Fellow, Aspen FCS

Jessica Nowlan
Executive Director, Young Women’s Freedom Center

Adilka Pimentel
Coordinator of Leadership Development, Make the Road New York

Ninaj Raoul
Co-Founder & Community Organizer, Haitian Women for Haitian Refugees

Liz Ryan
President & CEO, Youth First Initiative

Elizabeth Tril
YR Media

Don Wells
Chief Empowerment Officer, Just in Time for Foster Youth

$5M

Awarded each year in AFF GRANTS

$73M

Awarded since 2001

43,580

Youth residing in juvenile detention, correctional and/or residential facilities in the U.S.*

39,210

Children ages 16-20 who exited foster care in 2018**

*As of 2017. Figure provided by Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

**Figure provided by KIDS COUNT data center.